ACMC

Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer

 
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Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 5 - Sunday, 26 March 2006, 8:17 AM
 
Hello,

I thought I'd report on the results of my first use of the Tabletop Temperer by ACMC. Some of these comments are included in another message in this section. Daniel seems to be the resident expert on this machine as he's has his for more than a year and uses it frequently. I'd like to ask that he comment on the items I mention below.

1. The instructions state to load an even amount of chopped, unmelted chocolate to the front and back sections and set the temperature to 99 degrees to melt the chocolate. Then, when the chocolate is 1/2 melted, turn on the rotating bowl feature.

The challenges I had with this approach were that the chocolate that was not yet melted would be pushed up into the corners of the bowl behind the baffel and spill slightly over the sides. I often had to scrape the clumped chocolate off the baffle to get it to fall back into the bowl to complete melting. Additionally, setting the temperature to 99 degrees was simply not hot enough to melt all of the chocolate. The machine goes to 120 degrees. I set mine to 115 degrees and the chocolate started to melt more thorough ( A note about this is I know the company is trying to be very conservative about their temperature suggestions to prevent problems due to different temperatures for different chocolates). Although 115 was a much more appropriate temperature for my semi-sweet chocolate, there were still unmelted chips floating around in the tempered chocolate. This causes a problem, especially when you're trying to spread the chocolate out on a flat surface to make curls, cutouts, etc.

I think the best approaches for starting with unmelted chocolate are these:
- if you're starting with "chip" sized chocolate, premelt it somewhat. This will be faster and may prevent chips from remaining unmelted. If you're chocolate can tolerate it, set the temperature to 115-117 because cooling to again help ensure all the chips are being melted.
- Use shaved chocolate rather than chips. Because the peices will be smaller and melt faster, this will better ensure even melting. And this approach may not require pre-melting.

2. When working with the tempered chocolate, I would often add 1/2 cup or so to the back of the baffle to remplish the chocolate in the front. Because I'm working with the chocolate at 87-88 degrees, this additional chocolate in the back would melt, but not very quickly and it never melted completely before I was finished working. The chocolate clumped to the side of the baffle and I had to scrape it off with a spoon when I removed the baffle for cleaning. I'm not certain how one would go about working when a great deal of chocolate is needed as the lower temperatures aren't quite hot enough for the remplish rate to keep up with the use rate.

Other than these things, the machine worked great once I got used to its process. The chocolate tempered very well. I also had excellent environmental conditions - 68 degrees with 39% humidity.

I'll report more once I continue to use the machine. Daniel, any comments or suggestions to points 1 and 2 above based on your experience?

Thanks,
Zach
Picture of User 25
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 25 - Sunday, 26 March 2006, 8:33 PM
 
Here's more of a step by step of how I do it. I'm sure with experience and practice you'll come up with a better way. Unitl then, this method has served me very well.

1) Chop around one pound of chocolate and dump it in the bowl. I find it easier to use the front but I'm sure the back will do as well.

2) Turn it on, setting 112, but leave the bowl off for now.

3) Chop another 2 pounds, put it in a bowl and microwave it gently, stirring often, until it's melted or nearly so.

4) Pour the melted chocolate over the chopped stuff in the bowl and let it sit for 4-5 minutes.

5) Turn the bowl motor on. I keep a spatula handy here because sometimes the chocolate likes to climb up before it mixes together. If this is too bad it's a clue it needs to sit a bit longer without the motor.

6) When the melting is well along I add another couple of pounds of chopped chocolate, 1/2 pound at a time.

7) Let it run for 15-20 minutes so those chunks you mentioned go away. The temp should be holding around 112 by now.

Cool Set temp to 82-83. Keep an eye on it as the unit gets near the low end. If unattended it can slowly thicken up. Right after the low temp is reached set it to 88-89.

9) Let it run 2-3 minutes at that temp and begin working. Leave the bowl motor on.

10) Depending on room conditions it can begin to thicken after a bit. I find I can hold off starting over (more on that in a sec) by setting the temp to 90.

11) No matter what I do, the room temp will eventually overcome the working temp of the chocolate, causing it to thicken slowly and making it difficult to work with. At that point I just reset the temp to 110-112 and take a break. I'll add more chopped chocolate here to replenish what I've used vs what I still need. Repeat as needed.

Let me know if I've confused you...

Daniel
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Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 5 - Monday, 27 March 2006, 6:21 AM
 
Thanks, Daniel. That provides some enlightenment about approaches I can take as well. Once I develop my own approach, I'll fill everyone in more. I plan on using it again soon. I'll also be buying another bowl/baffle to make change outs easy.

Zach
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Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 146 - Thursday, 21 February 2008, 6:09 AM
Picture of trish santos
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by trish santos - Thursday, 8 December 2011, 11:30 AM
 
Can you give me the temps for each type of chocolate, or is it the same?  I am going to try mine for the first time...but after reading everything it seems so complicated and I'm getting nervous about it. I'm used to by revolution that I just push the button...
Picture of User 157
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 157 - Thursday, 17 April 2008, 6:26 AM
 
Hi, Zach,

Thanks for moderating all these discussions. I've looked through most of them. Now that you have had your ACMC Tabletop temperer for 2+ years, any comments? If you were to suggest a tempering machine of that size which appear to be the Little Dipper, ACMC, Chocovision X (? am I missing any others), which would it be and why?

Also, perhaps participants can make suggestions on what they felt were basic tools (i.e. tempering machines, guitar, bigger items) to start a very small chocolate making business on a limited budget? If there is a better forum to discuss starting a chocolate business and/or different business approaches, and distribution patterns, can someone let me know?

Thanks,

Elaine
Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Friday, 29 August 2008, 7:12 PM
 
I ve had my ACMC for two years now and love it. Never had a problem with it and it has made over 20,000 truffles / bons etc.

I would love to upgrade to a Hilliards Hand Dipper.

If anyone hears on one used, please send me an email to

argento102@ gmail.com.

Im in Ontario Canada, but a stateside seller is fine too.

Thanks Smile

Darren
Picture of User 192
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 192 - Tuesday, 16 September 2008, 5:07 AM
 
I'm new here to the forum and hope my comments help those others with this machine -

I use Callebaut callets in my chocolates and have used the ACMC tabletop now for about 5 years. First off, before anything else, I have not had an ounce of problems with this machine - it just keeps on working hard. Of course, I try and keep it clean and running smoothly but really no maintenance issues at all.

I have used block chocolate and the callet's and find the callets to be the most efficient for my use; excellent quality, low amount of prep work, convenient, easy to use, etc. (one thing that has me concerned is the continued availability of 100 watt light bulbs with the recent "green" initatives and the movement to the mini-florescent bulbs)

I use my tabletop to hand dip toffee, truffles, pretzels, strawberries, and to temper chocolate that I use to mold chocolates.

I like to "test" my thermometer on a regular basis to assure that the probe is reading temps properly. The last thing I want to do is set my temp to a specific degree and find out that the machine is reading one or two degrees off (which as you know can result in poor chocolates and un-saleable goods)

As for "running" chocolate; I pre-melt my callets slowly in a microwave at 1/2 power prior to depositing in the machine, stirring frequently. I will then pour the semi-melted chocolate into the machines back chamber, allowing the melted chocolate to flow and mix with the tempered chocolate. This allows my production to keep moving at a steady rate. I've also noticed that the chocolate can accumulate in the "corner" of the baffle between the back bowl and the front, but I just occasionally will take a small spatula and will push it down into the back for melting and mixing

If the chocolate begins to thicken during production runs that is indicative of chocolate becoming over-seeded, so, I stop everything and re-temper the chocolate that is in the bowl.

I just returned from the Philadelphia Candy Show and saw a machine that has me intrigued. It has me intrigued because (like the Hilliard?s machine) the owner has the option of adding a conveyer to the unit to allow for automatic enrobing of centers and the machine I looked at is considerably less expensive than the Hilliards. Considering the work I do with toffee, pretzels, etc such a unit would increase production while decreasing labor and to me, that's a big return on my investment. For example, I just ran a run of 42 pounds of toffee, which used 23 pounds of chocolate and took one operator approximately 16 hours. (final net weight of product is 65 pounds) The operator was my partner, but if I was paying labor for her time vs. running an enrober, well, I think everyone can see where I'm coming from.

For those of you who have not attended the Philadelphia Candy show, I strongly urge you to do so. There is a ton of great and useful information to be found there. (In fact, I originally bought my ACMC tabletop at the show years ago. I haven't seen a rep from ACMC since though, I'm sad to say)

I've learned a lot from this forum and hope to continue reading and contributing in the future. Thank you to all.

I hope what I've said makes some sense and is of value to some of you. Sorry to be so long winded-I'll shut up now.

Happy confectioning
Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Tuesday, 16 September 2008, 5:16 AM
 
I have used to ACMC T/T for some time now too. Truffles, bon bons etc..all with Callebaut 811 or 835 and Lindt P. Cru.

No issues at all! I keep a stock of "SERVICE" type 100 watt bulbs around.

Good post man.

Anybody have a Hilliards Hand Dipper for Sale in Canada?
Picture of User 157
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 157 - Tuesday, 16 September 2008, 6:12 AM
 
Thanks for the details - I'm about to use my new ACMC today so appreciate the tips. It talks about either melting the tempered chocolate at a low heat, or using the machine to temper. When you talk about adding semi-melted chocolate to the back, have you completed a tempering cycle and that is what is sitting in the front of the baffle?
Also, do you have the name of the manufacturer that you saw at the Philadephia Candy show?

Thanks much.
Picture of User 157
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 157 - Tuesday, 16 September 2008, 3:34 PM
 
Well, I finished my first day with the ACMC and have to say, the temper wasn't great, but I'm pretty sure I'm not doing something correctly. I used the "retemper" technique and found that by the time I had returned the chocolate to 89 degrees, that it was really too thick for dipping. Also, I noticed that although the temperature read as 89, double checking with my own infrared thermometer, I had a temp of 84. So I increased the temperature setting to 91 degrees which helped thin out the chocolate. Then i wasn't sure if I should turn off the bowl motor or try to dip my ganache while the bowl continued to turn. I chose the former since that is what I'm use to but found that the chocolate would get too hot (95). So, if anyone could make some suggestions, that would be a big help. Also, I noticed that the end product had these little pit like texture on some of the chocolates.

Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Tuesday, 16 September 2008, 3:39 PM
 
What chocolate are you using? I ve been using 811 / 835 for dark & 823 for Milk with the ACMC. Never a problem. I heat the dark though to 117, down to 83 then back to 90 degreess, w/ no problems.

If you have a unsync'd therm. on the machine then its not telling the lamps to heat high enough (assuming ur using dark)

what chocolate are you using?

D
Picture of User 157
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 157 - Tuesday, 16 September 2008, 3:48 PM
 
That might have been part of the problem - I had several untempered pieces of chocolate from a prior tabling attempt and combined them with tempered chocolate - all guittard, around 68% I believe. Maybe I need to just start with fresh tempered chocolate 100%. I've not run into this problem with my Revolution 2 though.

Picture of Roseli D'Agostino
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by Roseli D'Agostino - Wednesday, 31 August 2011, 10:09 AM
 

Hello!

How do you re-test the ACMC thermometer - dip it in boiling water and read?If not reading properly how do you re-calibrate?

Picture of User 192
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 192 - Tuesday, 16 September 2008, 6:44 AM
 
Remember that melting chocolate and tempering chocolate are two different functions totally.

I have used the machine to temper the chocolate, however, I find it much more expedient to use both the machine and the microwave to begin the initial use and continued use.

For example: I turn on the ACMC machine and set it to my "working" temp (turn on as in the black switch by the power cord for power; no revolving of bowl) This allows the machine to warm up the bowl for the initial chocolate

I will take 2 1/2 pounds of Callets; microwave for 2 minutes on 1/2 power and stir. The chocolate will begin to melt at this stage and be very "lumpy". I then microwave on short bursts (approx 15 to 20 seconds) at 1/2 power and stir again. The chocolate now is beginning to melt smoothly, yet still contains unmelted pieces of chocolate. I try and keep the temperature to no more than 92 or 93 degrees F.

When I get the chocolate to this stage, I will pour this into the working side (front) of the bowl on the ACMS and turn on the rotational feature. This allows the chocolate to be stirred and heated (both from the machine and the residual heat of the melted chocolate).

By working in such a fashion, the "raw" chocolate does not go out of temper and therefore should remain in temper for use. If you go to high in your temperature while melting, you MUST temper your chocolate.

For continued use/replenishment I use the same procedure as above for melting chocolate and introduce that to the machine in the back of the bowl. The machine does not have an exact fit between the plastic bowl divider and the metal of the bowl, consequently some of the unmelted chocolate may be introduced into your working chocolate. If this occurs, simply take a break, go get a drink, use the bathroom, sample some of your earlier work... and let the machine melt out the unmelted chocolate. Then, back to work.

I've loaded at most 5 pounds of chocolate (melted as above) into the machine. My partner does not like to use the machine with that amount of chocolate, she finds it to be overkill, she likes me to prepare and load the machine with 2 1/2 pounds per load.

To answer your question about the chocolate in front of the baffle, yes, that is the tempered chocolate I am working with, as I need more chocolate I will melt additional chocolate using the method above and introduce it behind the baffle - so I'm working from the front and the "new" chocolate is in the back.

As for the unit I mentioned from the candy show - I have that information in my home office (I'm at my daily 9 to 5 right now) and will be happy to share that with the forum when I return home tonight.

All I ask for is patience as I'm preparing a huge order this week and I'm a tad exhausted.
Picture of User 157
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 157 - Tuesday, 16 September 2008, 3:45 PM
 
Thanks much for such a thorough answer - when you're less busy, I'd love to ask a few more questions about using the ACMC since I didn't have the most successful day, but can hold off until you have more time.
Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Tuesday, 16 September 2008, 3:47 PM
 
Hey no sweat,

email me at argento102@ gmail.com anytime.

email me any questions u have fella Smile

Darren
Picture of User 157
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 157 - Wednesday, 17 September 2008, 7:54 AM
 
When using the ACMC - do you keep the bowl motor running when you are dipping your cut ganache? That's what the manufacturer is telling me, but it seems like it would be challenging to chase the pieces in the moving melted chocolate. Any ideas?


Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Wednesday, 17 September 2008, 8:03 AM
 
Yep, leave it running.

Heres a tip. Take a "4 tined fork", cut the middle two tines off w/ snips.

Take some plieres and JUST bend the first 2mm of the end tines to create HOOK like ends. When you drop the ganache or truffle in, the ends can quickly hook the truffle etc.

I can do about 200 an hour with this method.

Also,..take a thin steel "skewer" cut it about 6"

When you hook the truffle, run the tine down the bottom of the fork to rid the excess chocolate. This cuts waste down by 60-70%

Picture of User 157
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 157 - Wednesday, 17 September 2008, 8:12 AM
 
Thanks - I'll try that - when you say fork , do you mean an actual fork or a dipping tool? And I'm assuming it's just a little bit bent at the ends of the tines so that the chocolate can slip off easily still? Lastly, to get a thin coating, I've alway tapped on the bowl a few times and wiped at the edge. Do you still achieve a thin coat with wiping with the steel rod under the fork?
Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Wednesday, 17 September 2008, 8:16 AM
 
Just a long tined regular fork yep.

You still get the coating from running down the bottom.

Viscos. of chocolates are different so you'll find a happy medium between scraping, tapping, heat etc.

Practice using Callebaut 811. Its quite forgiving.

Up to 117 > Down to 83 > Up and hold at 89-90 degrees.
Picture of User 192
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 192 - Tuesday, 23 September 2008, 5:12 AM
 
I deeply apologize to those that have been awaiting my responses to the machine I mentioned in the above comments.

Earlier this month (September) I attended the Philadelphia National Candy Show in Atlantic City, NJ. While there I spoke to a representative of PERFECT EQUIPMENTS, INC.

I am impressed by their machines as well as the cost. They are located in Quebec - I believe some of you are in that general geographic area.

Their web site is: http://www.perfectinc.com/index.html

The machine I am considering is an AIR-2 water compact tempering machine. It is "expandable" allowing for additional pieces of equipment such as a vibrating table and an enrobing machine (ENRO-2). Perfect for pretzels, toffee's, chocolate/sandwich cookies, etc.

Again, I'm sorry for the delay in getting this information to the forum, if anyone has any thoughts on this equipment, I would love to hear them.
Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Tuesday, 23 September 2008, 6:07 AM
 
Hey fella,

No sweat,..everybody is industry based so its QUITE understandable. as time is never a granted thing Smile

You replied and thats all that matters. That company looks great. I'm calling now. Hilliards is NOT the only game in town Razz

D
Picture of User 157
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 157 - Tuesday, 23 September 2008, 6:22 AM
 
Thanks for the information, I sent for a catalog and pricing list. It would be interesting to see how the pricing varies c/w other similar machinery from the larger brands.

If you have a moment, I would like to ask you a few questions about the use of your ACMC. As has been mentioned earlier, during the dipping process, the bowl is still rotating - do you have additional suggestions in keeping the ganache from flipping over when trying to retrieve it?

Do you find that you need to use the shaved chocolate when cooling the chocolate as described in the directions? I'm assuming it is for seeding and more rapid cooling, but have noticed from other comments that you don't have to do this step.

Once you let the leftover melted chocolate harden, do you use it again for covering, or do you find that it doesn't provide as nice of a temper and so use it for ganache/ filling?

Thanks-
Picture of User 212
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 212 - Friday, 24 October 2008, 10:20 AM
 
Hi,

Did you end up purchasing equipment from Perfect? If so, how is it working for you? I am considering purchasing from them but do not know anyone who has used their equipment.
Picture of User 192
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 192 - Tuesday, 23 September 2008, 9:16 AM
 
All-

I'm not trying to downplay or promote any particular manufacturing company, for instance, Hilliards has a great product, but, they are expensive. I like the idea of the Perfect product because it is expandale and will grow with me and my needs (hopefully).

I wish I had the experience base to validate the old phrase "you get what you pay for" on all of the various equipment produced, alas, I do not.

When you get your catalong/price list, you'll find that there is a significant price difference between an air unit vs a water unit. I'm leaning towards the water unit because as I understand it, it is far easier to maintain a precise temp with water vs air.

You also asked about my experiences with my current ACMC.

(Question) As has been mentioned earlier, during the dipping process, the bowl is still rotating - do you have additional suggestions in keeping the ganache from flipping over when trying to retrieve it?

(answer) I think with most things in life, the best answer to this is practice, practice, practice. I've developed a sort of technique wherein the center (or product because I dip toffee, pretzels, chocolate cookies [can I say O..O?) etc - in that the piece of goods is on my dipping fork and I then lower the fork and piece into the chocolate, pulling 'back and down' into the chocolate mass in order to enrobe the piece. Lift up, tap/scrape the bottom and place on my tray to harden. My sister who is truly my number one toffee enrober will put the piece into the chocolate and then 'fish' it out, tapping/scraping to remove excess chocolate and then when placing the finished piece onto the tray she will use the next (unfinished) piece of toffee to help place the finished piece on the tray (follow?)

I also will admit that I tend to mold the majority of my pieces, so I use the ACMS to temper the chocolate and then will work my molds from that mass, using a ladel to fill the mold and then inverting mold to allow chocolate to flow back into the tempering unit

(Question) Do you find that you need to use the shaved chocolate when cooling the chocolate as described in the directions? I'm assuming it is for seeding and more rapid cooling, but have noticed from other comments that you don't have to do this step.

(Answer) as we all know, tempering is the process of getting those pesky fat molecules to realign themselves with each other and produce a good finished product (as evidenced by the gloss, snap and lack of grey/white streaks etc.). I have used the machine to take the chocolate up to a higher temp, then reset the machine temp low, then back to working temp and this works fine for me, but, this process takes time. There are several ways to temper chocolate - this is but one. For the sake of time and speed, lately I've been using the Microwave to assist me. I will slowly melt the chocolate to a point where I have a mixture of melted chocolate and unmelted chocolate (I am using Callebaut Callets). I then take this mass and pour it into my ACMC (set at my working temp) and allow the machine to 'finish' melting/tempering the chocolate. This method has produced very good to excellent results for me and my staff.

When replenishing my working chocolate, I use a similar method to the above.

(Question) Once you let the leftover melted chocolate harden, do you use it again for covering, or do you find that it doesn't provide as nice of a temper and so use it for ganache/ filling?

(Answer) The first part of your question leads me to ask you a question. Are you turning off the machine and letting the chocolate remaining in the ACMC harden? I do not do that - I always take the bowl and empty any remaining chocolate onto a cooling tray and spread it out into a nice thin (as possible) form. In my opinion, there is nothing wrong with this chocolate, all that's required is to retemper the chocolate in order to realign the molecules. The chocolate that is left over should be tempered - if you find it's not, how does the finished product look from the mass you were using?

Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Tuesday, 23 September 2008, 9:25 AM
 
Any excess chocolate left over I spread thinly over transfer sheets to printed shards, ribbon etc.

No waste... Razz
Picture of User 143
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 143 - Tuesday, 23 September 2008, 4:58 PM
 
Hello, i have just figured out how to access this forum. i have an ACMC (i think they want to make it look like ACME, you all have already figured this one out) unit and the past two times i have tried to use it has been dismal--probably me! The chocolate is thick like sludge and trying to dip something in it results in a coating about 1/2" thick. I am thinking it is the temp. sensor needing to be replaced.
i bought it used, back in April . it arrived in very good condition. i bought a few extra parts, but not a thermometer. i have been checking with another reliable thermometer and the ACMC temp is a degree or two lower. i have become so frustrated with it, i have stopped using it. i gave up on a three pound batch and that was hard to swallow! i needed the chocolates the next day. So, i probably gave up on it in haste. Oh well!
That is a great suggestion about pre-warming the chocolate via the microwave!
re: the 100watt bulbs--i haven't been able to find the exact ones they recommend GE Survivor bulbs? anyone know: are they available in this part of Canada (Sunshine Coast, BC)?
Thank you all for posting your experiences with ACMC, helps me problem-solve a whole lot easier! jan
Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Tuesday, 23 September 2008, 8:36 PM
 
Hi ONE WOMAN SHOW,

The bulbs are known as ROUGH SERVICE or EXTREME service 100w bulbs.
I live in Ontario and yes they are available thru Canada.

Sold as GE Service Bulbs.

Smile
Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Thursday, 25 September 2008, 6:32 AM
 
One woman show:

what chocolate are you using? When you say sludge, that sounds like
a characteristic of low cocoa milk chocolate. What is the % of the it?

The callebaut milk i use i lead to 113, down to 82 then up and hold at 87 degrees. Lindt is close to the same in the ACMC.

I keep my humidity around 45% if possible and room temp at 68-70 degrees.

Greetings from Canada my BC sister.

D

Smile
Picture of User 143
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 143 - Thursday, 25 September 2008, 4:00 PM
 
Hello D,
i am using 69% dark, my own blend, coming from Sweet Earth Organics. i have worked with it successfully in the past(and using the microwave and seeding to temper, note:in some way high humidity!) and maybe i am just being too slow with the acmc. i also have to factor in humidity (which is in the 65-72% range). i have a dehumidifier going. And with the dehumidifier on, the temp in the small room also shoots up.
i contacted ACMC and was told that the tt temperer is a "batch" temperer, thats why i am thinking i am not working with the tempered chocolate fast enough, ie over-temperering it. i don't know, but i am feeling rather frustrated. i thought i had a handle on the process! i get into this headspace of thinking i am hopeless about this, and just want to give-up the dream of being able to make a go of a small, small business.
Thankyou for your replies and support. Great to hear from you! jan
Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Friday, 26 September 2008, 6:22 AM
 


I batch temper 5lbs at a time Jan. We'll get this figured out.

email me if you like and we'll figure it out. Everyone has had
nightmares that quickly sink ur cerebral boat. WE'LL FIX IT!!!

Darren

argento102@gmail.com

www.SilverCulinary.weebly.com
Picture of User 66
Re: Challenges when using ACMC Tabletop Temperer
by User 66 - Sunday, 5 October 2008, 5:17 AM
 
Oh Jan,

If your ACMC should start to crack underneath on the bottom piece,
just glue it w/ PVC glue. It comes in a little plastic bottle with a swab brush inside.

One last thing. I NEVER clean my ACMC bowl or plastic scrapers with soap. Hot water and a polishing cloth only.

D