ACMC

Tabletop Temperer is Great

 
Picture of User 25
Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 25 - Tuesday, 7 March 2006, 1:42 PM
 
I use the Tabletop Temperer and it's a great unit. I'd be sunk without mine. It's reasonably priced, quiet, easy to clean, and heats with 2 light bulbs. Electric rates are rising and it's cheaper to run than units that use forced hot air. Hair dryers use more energy than light bulbs. The body is strong hard plastic (not the cheap stuff) which makes it a lot lighter than a metal unit. The baffle is strong foodgrade plastic and the bowl is stainless steel.

Mine arrived with some cracks on the bottom. It must have been dropped hard at some point. They don't interfere with operation and it runs fine. I called to report it and ACMC offered to fix it free of charge if I sent it back. I declined because I can't do without it.

The instructions say to drop chopped chocolate in the melter side of the plastic baffle, turn it on, and come back later. I find it better to pre-melt in a microwave. It saves a lot of time. The temperature controls are digital, so they need to be set at each stage of the tempering process.

I dip right in the unit and ladle from it to fill molds.

Hope that helps,
Daniel
www.chocolatbydaniel.com
Picture of User 5
Re: Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 5 - Tuesday, 7 March 2006, 5:46 PM
 
Daniel,

How long have you had your machine?

Zach
Picture of User 25
Re: Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 25 - Tuesday, 7 March 2006, 7:21 PM
 
Zach,

Almost a year and a half. It's had a lot of use in that time...

Daniel
Picture of User 5
Re: Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 5 - Wednesday, 8 March 2006, 5:44 AM
 
Daniel,

I have these questions that I can't tell from the specs on the website:


I notice the specs say operates on 110 VAC. Does it plug into a 120-volt outlet? Where do you live?

Does the bowl rotate to agitate the chocolate or do you have to stir? I assume from the fact that it has a baffle, it agitates the chocolate. If so, do you ever notice that air is incorporated in the chocolate?

How do you replenish and temper more chocolate as the bowl starts to run out? Can you describe that process of adding more chocolate? Do you have to use all that's currently in the bowl and then start over or can you keep seeding to replenish?

Thanks for all the information!

Zach
Picture of User 25
Re: Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 25 - Wednesday, 8 March 2006, 8:18 AM
 
zrtownsend wrote on Wed, 08 March 2006 05:44

Daniel,

I have these questions that I can't tell from the specs on the website:


I notice the specs say operates on 110 VAC. Does it plug into a 120-volt outlet? Where do you live?

Does the bowl rotate to agitate the chocolate or do you have to stir? I assume from the fact that it has a baffle, it agitates the chocolate. If so, do you ever notice that air is incorporated in the chocolate?

How do you replenish and temper more chocolate as the bowl starts to run out? Can you describe that process of adding more chocolate? Do you have to use all that's currently in the bowl and then start over or can you keep seeding to replenish?

Thanks for all the information!

Zach


You bet, Zach.

It plugs into any household outlet. I live near Chicago.

The unit has two controls: on/off for the bowl motor and a digital temp setting.

The bowl rotates and the baffle, which divides the bowl in half and holds the temp probe, stays put. The chopped chocolate goes in the "rear" side for melting. As it melts the chocolate transfers to the "front" working side. The idea is to get both sides loaded with melted chocolate at whatever "high" temp you need for the chocolate of the day. I find it helps to pre-melt somewhat in a microwave.

At that point the temp is changed to whatever lower temp you need based on the chocolate being used. The bulbs go out and the fan kicks in to cool. When the lower temp is reached reset again to the higher working temp. When there begin working.

As the working side loses chocolate it replenishes from the back side. As levels drop chopped chocolate can be added to the back side.

Regarding air, I know what you mean and I've seen it happen several times. I know what causes it with my unit. After it's been running for awhile at the holding temp (I've been working) the chocolate sometimes starts to thicken a bit. It doesn't always happen, but when it does I see air introduced by the added friction between the baffle/scraper, bowl and chocolate. If I catch it right away I can fix it by increasing the temp a degree or two. If not I have to reheat back to the upper point. This isn't the end of the world because I'm usually ready for a break by then.

Make sense?

Daniel
Picture of User 5
Re: Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 5 - Thursday, 9 March 2006, 7:55 PM
 
Hi Daniel,

Just reviewing the specs of this machine again. How many lbs. of chocolate can you temper at one time in the machine? (I see the specs say the bowl capacity is 5 qts, but what does this equate to in lbs of chocolate?)

Thanks,
Zach
Picture of User 26
Re: Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 26 - Friday, 10 March 2006, 7:09 AM
 
Daniel,

How long does it take to change over from one type of chocolate to another? Or do you do one type one day and another the next?

All The Best,

Jayne Anne

Black Dog Chocolates
Picture of User 25
Re: Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 25 - Friday, 10 March 2006, 12:49 PM
 
jayneanne wrote on Fri, 10 March 2006 07:09

Daniel,

How long does it take to change over from one type of chocolate to another? Or do you do one type one day and another the next?

All The Best,

Jayne Anne

Black Dog Chocolates


Zach,

It will handle 5-6 pounds easy.


Jayne Anne,

There are several answers to the question. Removing the components is very easy - slip out the temp probe, unthread two caps, lift out the scraper, lift out the bowl. That's it. Here are some options:

1) Get extra bowls and scrapers and just replace the used with new, clean ones and start re-tempering the next batch. Elapsed time to begin new temper: 3 minutes.

2) Pull the items as above, clean them and put them back. Elapsed time to begin new temper: 10-15 minutes. Drying them completely is *hugely* important.

3) My favorite. Plan the work so I start with lighter chocolate and gradually work darker. I've done white, milk and dark all in the same day. I've tried doing white without cleaning up after a darker job and it is always a beige-brown disaster.

That help?
Daniel
www.chocolatbydaniel.com
Picture of User 26
Re: Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 26 - Monday, 13 March 2006, 7:06 AM
 
Daniel,

Yes, that helps.Thanks! I don't really have the money to get anything much bigger. It is getting tedious tempering in the double boiler!

I'm am impressed at the confections you turn out with that tiny temperer. You are an artist!

All The Best,

Jayne Anne
Black Dog Chocolates
Picture of User 25
Re: Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 25 - Tuesday, 14 March 2006, 5:49 PM
 
jayneanne wrote on Mon, 13 March 2006 07:06

Daniel,

Yes, that helps.Thanks! I don't really have the money to get anything much bigger. It is getting tedious tempering in the double boiler!

I'm am impressed at the confections you turn out with that tiny temperer. You are an artist!

All The Best,

Jayne Anne
Black Dog Chocolates


I was in the same financial boat when I chose this one over a Hilliard. It has served me very well. I'd buy one again and probably will before the year is over.

Thanks for the kind words regarding my work.

Daniel
Picture of User 5
Question regarding loading chocolate
by User 5 - Saturday, 25 March 2006, 11:17 AM
 
Daniel,

Can you tell us a little about how you load the chocolate and prepare it in the machine? I see that you semi-melt the chocolate before you add it to the hopper, but at what point do you turn on the rotating bowl? I turned on the bowl of mine with the chocolate melted about 1/2 way through on both sides of the bowl, but the unmelted chocolate clumped up around the corners at the bowl was spinning. I also notice that the temperature gage suddently fluctuated from 92 degrees to 104 degrees as soon as I turned on the bowl, I assume because the liquid chocolate at that point gathered around the thermometer.

Can you give a little more detail about the setup you go through to prepare the chocolate to temper? (when you turn on the bowl, how melted the chocolate is when the bowl is turned on, when you turn the bowl off, etc.). Do you turn the rotating bowl off while you're dipping or leave it running? I assume you leave it running in order to provide agitation to the chocolate to form the proper crystals.

Thanks,
Zach
Picture of User 47
Re: Question regarding loading chocolate
by User 47 - Monday, 4 September 2006, 8:49 PM
 
I've been using the ACMC machine for 2+ years!
It's been great! I wish all temperers where this inexpensive..
I use Wylbur Chocolates in 10# blocks, I just break them up and drop them in the back and front of the scraper.
I find that if you put the crumbs and small pieces in the front of the scrapper it melts fast and you can get more chocolate gonig faster.

Start by turning the power on and then turn the motor on right after. That way you can see how much chocolate you can put in the unit before it would overflow. If you're using real chocolate and not a compound,take the temp to 115-120F. Then, back down to 82F then 86-88F depending on the application you need.

Hope this helps
John
Picture of User 5
Re: Question regarding loading chocolate
by User 5 - Tuesday, 5 September 2006, 5:58 PM
 
Thanks for your reply! I've been using my ACMC machine for a few months now and love it. It's indeed great for the small quantity of dipping and very straight foward in its use - once you learn a few tricks as we've mentioned in this chain.

Zach
Picture of User 47
Re: Question regarding loading chocolate
by User 47 - Monday, 4 September 2006, 8:54 PM
 
The reason the tempeture changed so much is the location of the light bulbs under the bowl. By not turning the motor on at the start you are heating only a section of the bowl right away... This is also a good way to burn your chocolate. Remember the trick is to keep it moving all the time.
Picture of User 177
Re: Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 177 - Friday, 4 July 2008, 10:37 AM
 
I had operated a ACMC Table Top dippers for over 7 yrs. Prior to that I had a Hilliard Little Dipper. I constantly had problems with the Hilliard dipper, and to repair it was totally out of sight expensive. My sister opened a candy store in CA. so I let her have the ACMC and I bought two more. I have had the two machines for about two years now and have only had one problem with one of them and that was a thermostat that went bad after about one week. The company promptly sent the part to me and within 15 minutes I had it working again. If I was buying another table top dipper today it would be the ACMC. The bodies of the dippers are made of ABS Plastic but I have had no cracks in any of them like I read in one of the comments but of course we don't use them as footballs. The temperature is controlled perfect.
Picture of User 5
Re: Tabletop Temperer is Great
by User 5 - Friday, 4 July 2008, 10:41 AM
 
Hi,

Thanks for the feedback. Yes, I've had no problems with mine whatsoever. Mine actually sits sometimes for weeks (or even months) before using it and it turns on perfectly and works as expected. I've been very happy with it.

Zach