Chef Rubber Warmers

Diana Youngerman talks about warmers

 
Picture of User 2
Diana Youngerman talks about warmers
by User 2 - Monday, 20 November 2006, 11:46 AM
 
Hello all!
It's been a few months since I've checked the forum, but I have some information on Chef Rubber's chocolate warmers to share. I am a Chocovision Rev. X3210 user, but I have ordered two of the Italian-made warmer units to try out.

Comparing the Mol d'Art (Belgian) chocolate warmers to the Italian version, I was told that the Italian-made units have some advantages. The warming mechanism is better and more even, the temperature control is more accurate, the lids are stainless steel, etc. Basically, a little better engineered and put together. For both manufacturers, the stainless steel "trays" where you keep the chocolate are removable for easy cleaning. Both machines provide even heat to the bottom and sides of the tray.

I am not planning to "direct temper" with these warmers. Here is a description of how I was instructed to temper chocolate in the warmers:

The day before, fill the warmer with your chocolate. Set the temperature high enough that all the crystals will be melted (~130-135 F for dark chocolate, lower for milk & white, as we all know, and depending on the specifics of your favorite chocolate). Cover and leave it alone.

The next day, turn the temperature down to your ideal level (~86-89 for dark, etc.). Look at the melted chocolate. If there is a fairly large mass of unmelted chocolate in the center, blend it into the melted chocolate with an immersion blender. If there is little or no unmelted chocolate remaining, add 1/3 by weight of small pieces of chocolate and blend with an immersion blender. The immersion blender will cool the melted chocolate as it works in the unmelted pieces, precrystallize it, and agitate it to propagate beta crystals. Check for temper and start working.

I have been cautioned to stir the chocolate around frequently to keep it at an even temperature throughout and to get in the habit of regularly checking temper. If you break temper, lower the temp and simply blend in some chocolate pieces. If your chocolate begins to over-crystallize, raise the temp a degree, just like with any tempering machine.

My new warmers are due to arrive any day now, so I am excited to begin working with them! The biggest reasons I chose to investigate them are being able to leave them on overnight or all day without worry (see my posts on the Rev X3210 for details of my good and bad experiences with that machine), lower cost for comparable capacity (the 6L machine is supposed to have about a 6 Kilo capacity for under $700), and much lower energy usage. Also, air will not be introduced into the chocolate as with some automatic tempering machines.

I thought long and hard about all the references I saw to this type of equipment in the literature I've read and from all the people I've spoken to. In my opinion, they wouldn't be so widespread in the industry if they were not capable, quality machines. I don't think Norman Love and Jean-Pierre Wybau would use them if they weren't a really good product!

So that's my two cents on chocolate warmers. I will post more as I gain experience with my new equipment. I hope the opinions I've formed from my research will help my fellow chocolatiers know what questions to ask and decide if these might be a good purchase.

Bon Chocolat!
Diana

PS - As an aside, I have found Chef Rubber's staff and owners to be a great resource and VERY knowledgeable about all things pastry and chocolate. In fact, one of the owners used to be the staff chocolatier for Felchlin (a Swiss chocolate manufacturer). Bottom line, they really seem to know their stuff and they answer questions without B.S.-ing. "No B.S." means that you might not always get the answer you want to hear, but there's a solid reason for the advice you're getting. They like helping very small businesses and start-ups figure out what they need and how to use it most efficiently, in my experience.

Diana Youngerman
Mariposa Chocolatier, LLC
Contact@MariposaChocolate.com
Picture of User 73
Re: Diana Youngerman talks about warmers
by User 73 - Tuesday, 30 January 2007, 1:38 PM
 
Hi Diana,

I was just wondering if you know the name of the Italian chocolate melters.
Picture of User 21
Re: Diana Youngerman talks about warmers
by User 21 - Tuesday, 20 February 2007, 2:11 PM
 
Sorry for the delayed reply. I didn't get a note that a reply had been posted.

My machines are made by Martellato in Italy. As far as I've been able to tell, Chef Rubber is the only company selling these in the US. The Martellato machines are a bit more expensive than the Mol d'Art, but they are made better and are easier to clean.

Hope that helps!
Picture of User 135
Re: Diana Youngerman talks about warmers
by User 135 - Sunday, 30 December 2007, 9:12 AM
 
HOW MUCH IS YOUR MCHINES. I AM LOOKING FOR A SMALL MACHINE.'''


dyoungerman wrote on Tue, 20 February 2007 14:11

Sorry for the delayed reply. I didn't get a note that a reply had been posted.

My machines are made by Martellato in Italy. As far as I've been able to tell, Chef Rubber is the only company selling these in the US. The Martellato machines are a bit more expensive than the Mol d'Art, but they are made better and are easier to clean.

Hope that helps!

Picture of Melanie Boudar
Re: Diana Youngerman talks about warmers
by Melanie Boudar - Thursday, 8 October 2009, 2:35 AM
 
I have had a Martellano warmer for about a year, maybe more. It is used as a backup to keep chocolate melted to dump into my SELMI tempering machine.
It is typically set at 40 C.
Last week it had a total meltdown! Must have been a faulty thermostat. The entire plastic underneath melted and collapsed and of course all the chocolate burned. Since it was close to $1000 I am not too happy about it.