Selmi Chocolate Machinery

Love my Selmi but....

 
Picture of Melanie Boudar
Love my Selmi but....
by Melanie Boudar - Thursday, 1 September 2011, 10:21 AM
 
I decided to elaborate on my original post for those of you considering a SELMI. have owned my Selmi now for about three years. I was not fortunate enough to get a personal demo of the machine as I live very far from Tomric who is the US distributor. At the time I purchased the machine there was not even a manual for the enrober so its been a lot of trial and tribulation learning the ins and outs of this machine. Tomric has been good to respond to any issues I have had ( blown fuses, belt popped off, error messages etc) and we have solved problems by phone and picture sharing.


What I really love about this machine is the versatility. I like to enrobe AND mold and the SELMI does both. For molding I don't think there is a better machine out there. The vibration table sits over the tank and its a very ergonomic rythmn to fill, vibrate, dump and scrape across the scraper bar.


If it were a competition I think I could mold about 100 molds in an hour.The vibration table is quite strong so it takes some practice to dump and vibrate the mold to ensure a thin but thick enough shell. A thin shell will result in the piece not releasing from the mold or collapse at the point where the top meets bottom as that edge tends to be the thinnest. I'd recommend filling and releasing shells without any fillings in them until you get the hang of proper wall thickness.


With a 50lb melted chocolate capacity you can put out a lot of product before you need to think of refilling and when you do refill, its only about 10-15 min to melt the the chocolate and another 10-15 min to have a perfect temper. I fill mine at night and rarely need to refill during the day. The fact that I have perfect tempered chocolate all day long at the press of a couple buttons is worth every penny in timesaving. To me its like having an excellent employee with the personal headaches and needs of a real person.( and it never asks for a raise or is late for work)


I have more challenges with enrobing-specifically drag lines that require we clean up the pieces by trimming with a scissor before cupping. We put a nice bottom on our pieces in the ganache frame, and they are cut with a guitar, left a night to get a slight crust on them before enrobing. The pieces are put diagonally onto the belt in a formation that allows us to use an entire transfer or texture sheet.


Once My detailer broke and was replaced with a newly welded one but it has never been quite the same. While I was waiting for a new part to arrive I carefully duct taped the existing one and was able to continue production.


The detailer is moving in the correct direction and the blower, paper tensioner knobs and belts have all been adjusted.The tension knobs should be removed periodically and rinsed in hot water to ensure all the moving parts are free.



I find the belts that power the motor do dry out or stretch and need replacement every 6 months or so.


From day to day it behaves different and thats whats is frustrating.. Some days the chocolates enrobe and come off the belt clean as a whistle, other days the ganache gets jammed up in the space between the wire belt and the take off, or drags an excess of chocolate, all for no logical reason.


We have also found that when the paper roll is a bit off , either due to rough handling in shipping, not being aligned on the bar perfectly, or the nut not tightened enough or a roll of paper which has slipped a bit in its roll the tension on the paper changes and results in these annoying drag lines. To compensate, I use my hand as a pressure guide on the paper as the pieces come off the wire belt onto the paper and keep a tool in my right hand to push stragglers if necessary. In leiu of your hand you could put a weighted bar on the paper. The tension knobs are supposed to help control the feed of the paper but I would say they are inadequate to do so, Note this will happen if the ganache is too soft but also happens when it is not too soft.


The take off area is long enough to do runs of between 15-20 pcs at a time depending on how long you need to decorate your pieces before they start to set up.I work in a room temp of 75 but if your room is colder you will need to decorate quite fast. We cut and slide the first group onto the shelf that you can place alongside, then after the third run comes thru we transfer the first one to a sheet pan by holding the paper taut. We stack the chocolates until we have about 3 rows deep and then transfer them to a cool room.


One of the great things about this machine is that set up and take down is only about 10 or 15 minutes. The belt needs to have the chocolate completely melted with a heat gun or hairdryer before engaging the belt forward. The price for being impatient is that the belt will pull apart and getting that chain mail re-looped and flat is a challenge you don't want to undertake, especially a couple weeks before Xmas. I was lucky to only have a couple inches of belt pull apart and it took about 9 hrs to repair it. I keep my eye on all the belt loops like a hawk now to make sure they are closed. The belt cannot be slipped off to repair it so working in a most awkward position to fix it was not pleasant.


Press that forward button while keeping your eye on the belt in two places- where it first becomes visible and where it goes underneath the detail to return. Short stop, start and melt until you are certain there is not the slightest pull on the belt.


This is a fabulous machine but I wouldn't trust an untrained person to operate it. The lack of a need to know how to temper chocolate may be EZ for a newbie but It requires not being asleep at the wheel to ensure all parts are operating correctly thats for sure..I let beginners learn how to load correctly first, the take off end requires more skill and attention to detail and a think fast on your feet attitude if something goes wrong.


Again, I love my SELMI but still have challenges with enrobing-specifically drag lines that require we clean up the pieces by trimming with a scissor before cupping. We put a nice bottom on our pieces in the ganache frame, and they are cut with a guitar, left a night to get a slight crust on them before enrobing.
Once My detailer broke and was replaced with a newly welded one but it has never been quite the same.


It is moving in the correct direction and the blower, paper tensioner knobs and belts have all been adjusted.


I find the belts that power the motor do dry out and need replacement every 6 months or so.


From day to day it behaves different and thats whats s frustrating.. Some days clean as a whistle, other days the ganache gets jammed up in the space between the wire belt and the take off, or drags, all for no logical reason.


We have also found that when the paper roll is a bit off , either due to rough handling in shipping, not being aligned on the bar perfectly, the nut not tightened enough or a roll of paper which has slipped a bit in its roll the tension on the paper changes and results in these annoying drag lines. To compensate, I use my hand as a pressure guide on the paper as the pieces come off the wire belt onto the paper and keep a tool in my right hand to push stragglers if necessary. Note this will happen if the ganache is too soft but also happens when it is not too soft. It requires not being asleep at the wheel thats for sure..
Picture of christian chambord
Re: Love my Selmi but....
by christian chambord - Wednesday, 15 August 2012, 10:57 AM
 
Hi, i have a top selmi machine in argentina. I started having problems with the cooling system, I bought the machine from second hand as it was and it didnt come with any explanation or guide, specially for the electric and coling system. does anyone have this information and is able to send me by mail. I would really apreciate it, i would also make a deposit if it is required.

I hope you can help me because i returned to the old way tempering on the table
Picture of Melanie Boudar
Re: Love my Selmi but....
by Melanie Boudar - Thursday, 15 November 2012, 12:59 AM
 
there is fluid that needs to be added to a pipe on top. This fluid helps with the cooling. Contact Selmi in Italy and ask what the fluid is and how to obtain it.
Picture of kate lyons
Re: Love my Selmi but....
by kate lyons - Thursday, 1 November 2012, 6:28 AM
 
Melanie,

I feared the response to my search for repairing the belt on our Selmi enrober. 9 hours! :( Do you have any information that would be helpful as we repair it? I just received the 12" of replacement belt in the mail from Tomric yesterday. We also have about 3" to repair. Thank you so much!

- kate lyons
Picture of Melanie Boudar
Re: Love my Selmi but....
by Melanie Boudar - Thursday, 15 November 2012, 1:05 AM
 
I didn't use replacement, I just rewove what was there very patiently with two pliers. You have to bend all the loops and keep them as flat as possible.I also have a hammer to flatten if necessary.
Its been over a year now and I have not had any further issues but inspect all the belt loops after we wash the unit. I put a piece of blue tape on the problematic area to monitor it. I now heat the entire belt and rollers(paper guides) with a hairdryer and advance the belt bit by bit and be sure its running perfect before letting choc flow in.
I think Tomric has a video on repairing it. Good luck! It took a couple months for me to not be paranoid every time I used it.